Saturday, August 23, 2014

How do you like them apples?

Walking a higher road

I've spent a few days walking, talking and scouting walk routes with Luke. Wow.

Day 1- "Danger Luke Robinson".
These roads are just downright scary. The route 101 highway from Oreck to Patricks Point was a part of the route I walked with Luke. The hills, the narrow "shoulders"- more like fingers in my opinion, are just dangerous. Combine the hairpin curves with speeding traffic, distracted and well, rude drivers that won't move over create a hazardous scenario for our fuzzybutt friend and his Papi.  "zigging and zagging" along the road, yep, I get that now.  Luke is cautious and protective of his kids and from what I've witnessed, I think he would risk his own life to save theirs.

Day 2-The choir
As we walked from Patricks Point state park to Trinidad, we were serenaded by the beautiful sound of sea lions in the fog. We were off of route 101 and walked along the coast.  I felt fortunate to hear the sea lions singing, but sad that I couldn't see them through the thick, dense fog. Oh and yes, more hills, up and down and back up and then down.

The Digs
I actually enjoy camping out as it reminds me of my youth, when my family would go on camping adventures in our 1972 Chevy station wagon, loaded up with gear!  Those were the days.

I have mastered setting up and breaking down my tent in record time. (Actually, I think I'm quicker at it than Luke). What I bring to the campsite- lights, fun and purposeful battery operated mini flower multi colored string lights. They seem to be the funnest thing our fellow campers have seen.

My sleeping bag, pillow (yes, I brought my pillow from home), sleeping pad- not nearly thick enough as I can feel every stone, root and etc through it. The downside-the dirt factor.

Trust your instinct.
Believe what you see is real. Example, if you think you have just seen a bear on the other side of the campsite across from you, then trust that you have.
If your gut tells you to go right vs left, listen to no one. Trust your gut. And yes, I did spot a young black bear and when we walked down to check him out, we noticed his sibling/friend with him. Climbing trees for apples and not caring about us as we marveled at the peaceful coexistence.  2 black bears, 2 young bucks, 2 fawns and a few doe. The bucks, standing stoic as they protected the fawn and doe, and yes they were more cautious of us, than the black bears.

Believe in yourself.
You CAN do what you put your mind to. Walk at your own pace.  Focus on you and your goals and let the naysayers kiss your keester when you finish.

Note: the days I cranked out some miles walking with Luke were for my bestie, Kate, who has terminal cancer. Diagnosed with breast cancer a year ago, which spread to her bones in her spine and skull. She's in pain. As I walked with Luke and Indy, I thought of Kate. I dismissed the aches and pains felt while walking and post walk because, well Kate has aches and pains on a daily basis. I know Kate will continue her fight and stay strong. I am hoping next year, we can do our cross country adventure and kick up some dust along the way. Just like old days.  

Papa K.  This walk and trip has also inspired me to plan a cross country trip with Papa K.  He is living vicariously through me on this trek and wants to see the sights before his days are up. I will be part of that wish for Papa K.  Perhaps he joins Kate and I!  It would be a blast  for us driving across country in an RV, at our own pace, visiting anywhere we want. Papa K- wants Vegas to be part of our trip. And I can't wait to see him taking in the sights of Sin City, the Grand Canyon and Hoover Dam. 2015 will be a defining year. 

Thursday, August 21, 2014

13 YEAR OLD’S CLASS PROJECT FIGHTS CANCER IN DOGS AND PEOPLE

August 13, 2014
Franklin, MASS –
“Her name was Magic,” says 13-year-old Kimiya Kim.
“We were best friends. It was devastating when I lost her to cancer. One day she was active and playing around with me. The next day, she wouldn’t eat. She didn’t want to walk. We took her to the doctor’s office, and she never made it home.”
Kimiya’s beloved 8-year-old Bichon Frise succumbed to kidney tumors almost overnight—a senseless loss that affected Kimiya deeply.
Canine adenosarcoma is a rare, but incredibly aggressive form of cancer that affects a small percentage of dogs over the age of 8. The tumors grow rapidly, causing weight loss, loss of appetite, and lethargy. Diagnoses of all types of canine cancer, however, are growing at an alarming rate: statistically, fifty percent of older dogs now face the world’s deadliest disease.
In November 2013, Kimiya’s 7th grade teacher challenged her class to pick individual projects as part of a class effort to enhance community service. “Some people did a recycling project. Some made cards and went and visited the children’s hospital. No one had ever done a project related to animal cancer, so when I presented my idea, the class was very excited.”

Kimiya’s search for a project led her to the place most people go when faced with a helpless situation: the Internet.  “I just became determined to help other people who have been affected by cancer, and who have had pets they’ve lost to cancer. My uncle was diagnosed with lung cancer, and he fought it–he’s in remission. I found the Puppy Up Foundation website and knew it was right for me.”
The Puppy Up Foundation funds a unique area of cancer research that has recently delivered critical information in the fight against cancer: comparative oncology. This specialized and woefully overlooked area of cancer research humanely studies the disease in dogs and how it is similar to cancer in humans. Since dogs get the same cancers as people, information about treatments and methods of prevention is applicable to both species.
In other words, a cure for dog cancer almost certainly ensures a cure for people cancer. Kimiya spent time reading the articles at Puppyup.org, and ultimately decided to host aPuppy Up fundraising walk in her hometown of Franklin, Massachusetts. What began as a seventh grade class project will culminate in some fifty people (and their dogs) walking to end cancer in two species. The walk will happen August 23, just days before Kimiya starts the eighth grade, and she’s the keynote speaker for the opening ceremony.
“Several people in my life have had cancer. I did this for them.”
Make this the best class project everClick here to donate to Kimiya’s walk now, or register to walk with her on August 23 at Franklin Town Commons. You may also join the fight against cancer in pets and people here.
Puppy Up Foundation Links
Puppy Up Foundation on Facebook
Puppy Up Tweets
Puppy Up Pins

Monday, August 11, 2014

One Photo to Save Them All - Cancer Can't Keep a Good Dog Down

Cancer doesn't have a conscience. It takes precious things from you and leaves a dark aftermath. I figured that out when Malcolm exited this world. For months I stood in a deep pit of sadness with so many unanswered questions. It didn't take long for me to look around and see others sitting in that dirt right beside me.

To honor the great undaunted spirits of our friends taken by cancer, I started a calendar back in 2009. It was a simple and beautiful way to make some sense of these dark experiences, and the goodness just keeps growing. People write to my foundation (Puppy Up) with their stories and pictures every year. Puppy Up publishes the calendar and uses the proceeds to help fund major comparative oncology studies. It's an overlooked but critical area of cancer research that can give us endless information. 

My own Murphy appeared on one cover. If you want to tell us your story and join the fight against cancer in people and companion animals, I've posted the rules below.

Every single story helps, and we appreciate anything you can do.











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Welcome to the 2015 Cancer Can't Keep a Good Dog Down Calendar Contest!This contest gives you a way to honor your canine cancer hero while helping the Puppy Up Foundation raise funds for cancer research to benefit pets and humans.
How Does It Work? 
Register your dog. Simply upload your dog’s story and photo. For best results, use the best high-resolution digital photo you have. Please also be prepared to submit a high resolution digital photo of the same image (minimum of 500kb) upon request for reproduction in the calendar. Then provide a brief summary of your dog's story. The more you show your dog's personality, the more votes you will receive!


Who Can Enter? Anyone with a dog who currently has or has had cancer (living or passed) can enter, including dogs who have entered in previous 2 Million Dogs/Puppy Up calendar contests.
Get started right now. Or for more info, keep reading.
Voting Begins As Soon As You Enter
Your $10 registration becomes the first 10 votes for your dog.
To add more votes, share your dog's page on your favorite social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, and encourage everyone to vote for your dog. (The first vote is $5. All subsequent votes are $1 each.)
The 13 pets with the highest number of votes will win a Dog of the Month slot on the calendar. ALL photo entries will be included in our 2015 Calendar Photo Gallery. 
Your participation helps fund vital cancer research for dogs and humans. 
Begin here and follow the directions. Be sure to write down and remember your user name and password! 
For questions about the contest, please contact Erich Trapp at erich@puppyup.org.
 FAQ
Where Do My Voting Dollars Go? 
Your voting dollars go to fund cutting-edge research in comparative oncology, that branch of research that benefits both companion animals and humans in our fight against cancer.
What Makes a Puppy Up Calendar so Special?
Puppy Up Foundation uses our annual calendar as an educational tool about a critical and often overlooked area of cancer research called comparative oncology. There are important clues in the connections between human and canine cancers, especially since the resulting treatments benefit both species. One of the best ways to call attention to the need for this research is by telling your stories and showing your photos. It also helps transform our losses into information that helps fight the world's deadliest disease.
Why Do I Need This Calendar (when it's published)?
First, every dog entered appears in the calendar. No one gets left behind. We have a whole section of gallery photos dedicated to all of the dogs entered into the contest in addition to our winners who are featured as each month's "model."  We also include regular ‘people’ holidays and special dog holidays like National Puppy Day, Pet Theft Awareness Day, Take Your Dog to Work Day, World Animal Remembrance Month, Pet Cancer Awareness Month, etc.
Each calendar is a one-of-a-kind keepsakes.
Start right here today: look for the Register Here button on the left of the page. Click it and follow the directions.

Have fun and good luck!

Sunday, August 10, 2014

The Pyr Paw



To me it's always been a symbol of strength and solidarity.  Just open your palm and it's there.  It's loyalty, allegiance, and at times a lean-to, the late at night shelter in the wilderness of uncertainty.

Murphy used to paw me so much I called him Pez and I was the dispenser for whatever he needed and wanted.  

Today is the 3 month mark of our west coast walk and from my experience with Murphy I learned that the pyr paw sometimes means it's time to tap out.

Hudson cannot continue forward on this walk.  Paw problems have plagued him from close to the outset and to our damnest extent we've tried to figure out why and exhausted all solutions. The cold damp climate?  Non stop licking causing chronic inflammation and infection?  Some say there are microscopic sand burrs on the coastline and a whole host of other speculations.

But like any other father, still in the absence of a reason or a solution, a decision has to be made.

Hudson is being picked up today and transported back to Memphis.  Indiana and I will continue on with sadness in our hearts and the longing to be reunited will drive us the rest of the way. 

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Scenes from the roadside 3


Of course there's a zombie foot on our travels.  This was on the sidewalk in Florence OR


Curious moss covered listing ship in rogue river bay


Ummm did someone contact the marketing dept before putting a spout on the company van grill?  


The head shed?  Ok

Saturday and One Week till......



I leave my loves at home and go West for a bit. 



Famous Last Words.
“See you in a couple months”  When I last saw Luke and the boys about 5.5 months ago, I had intended to fly to Vancouver in May to see them off as they started their journey. Yes, renewed my passport and was planning my flight.  Stuff happens! (My beloved Papa K. was hospitalized and sent to a rehab facility).  The best plans can change due to unforeseen circumstances.  FYI, Papa K. is home and wreaking havoc in town.  Good for him, but poor Mom. 

Preparation
Luke and I discussed the walk in depth and agreed, that if I trained, both physically and mentally, I could do this.  Heck yes, I CAN do this.

I have a full one page list titled “California Trip Prep”.  The categories on my list include:  "Luke’s suggestions", my camping/hiking gear, camping items (yes, they are different from the gear portion of list!), “MY list”, Personal Care and Food/Bev. 

The highlights of this list seem to be in the “Personal Care” section of list and some make me chuckle…..Toilet Paper, Cleansing Wipes(yes, both ends!) and “Sponge or wash cloth”.  Benadryl-never leave home without it, and my Albuterol Asthma spray is another must have at all times.   

Shoes:  Critical as Luke’s stated.  My new Merrell hikers fit and feel as if I’ve had them for years.  I’ve probably put about 25 miles on them since last weekends purchase.  It may not seem like a lot, but considering I worked about 55 hours last week, it’s a good amount!  Yes, I looked like a dork at the gym with tall hikers on the treadmill and elliptical.  Toe cramps suck, and I’m not sure why the cute Vasques caused them.  Luckily, no cramps in the Merrell.  

I do have my list covered, except the rain poncho.  Need to pick that up this week.  Packweight is a concern and yes, I’m an over packer.  We’ll figure out what I need to leave in basecamp SUV when I get there.  As of course I need my flat iron, hairdryer, hair products and some other critical girly things for when I meet my friend Janet in Napa at the end of my trip for a couple days of r&r.   

Food/water:  It’s going to be about zone bars and nuts for me.  And yes, I really am taking the jar of Nutella Luke!  It’s already in the pack and accounted for in pack weight. :

Next post will be about the emotional highs and lows of prep and training.  One low happened yesterday at work, when it hit me hard that I will be away from my furkids (aka my loves) for 12 days…..12 days!

Tears flowed and flowed. 

Last minute questions/concerns-how do I cope w/missing the furkids for 12 days????  The lack of showering, girly things and etc seem so trivial compared to lack of snuggle, snuggle with my kids....

Till we meet again.

 V


Saturday, August 9, 2014


One Week Til V Day

Valerie

A week from today our good friend Valerie from CT is flying to CA to join us on the road for a week.  In her words she wants to experience what our life is like out here and not just walking a mile or a day.  Yep pack, tent, she'll be carrying her on weight.  I've invited her to guest blog here so we can discuss last minute preparations and she can share her side of the adventure.

V - 

I shed my base layers, tops and bottoms in Brookings & I've regretted it since.  Temps in Northern California, or at least this stretch of it ave low 60s in the day and 50s at night.  Sweltering heat from the rogue valley pulls high afternoon winds and fog banks and unless I'm in my tent snuggled up with the boys I'm chilled by the damp air.  

But as I've found along the coastline from Newport OR to here there are different microclimates distinct to each of the areas.

The redwood forests are right around the bend and I can't speak to the climate there yet.  My suggestion is pack lightweight base layers - silk, which I prefer, or wicking synthetic.  Fleece just adds more pack weight & don't think you'll need the heavier fabric.

Shoes - hope you have that worked out by now. Don't know why the vasques cause toe cramping - I love mine - but each foot has different demands.  But that has to be resolved ASAP.  Like fletcher wrote - footwear is the foundation - get that wrong and you won't make it a week.

Don't worry about packing first aid sundries - I keep sufficient supply.  Also I pack a multi tool, extra carabiners, zip ties etc.  

I'm worldly enough to know NOT to tell a woman what grooming/cosmetics to pack but since you'll be carrying your own food and water the pounds add up.  I have nail clippers (since I have to keep toes ultra short) razor & cream (travel size) and axe spray for when I'm in public and haven't had a chance to shower or do laundry.

You'll probably want to bring soap since most campgrounds have showers but I wouldn't expect that luxury more than once during the week.  

Other essentials in your pack - a cpl of ziplock bags to keep your electronics dry, poncho (even though I've only used mine twice in the 3 months on the road), a chamois or microfiber towel, sunblock (I don't carry any), a pkg of wipes or rinse free hand soap, bug spray (though I haven't had much of a problem thus far and I recommend skin so soft rather than a deet based product).  

Pillow - if your body contour requires it but I don't afford the space for one and instead use my clothes sack plus my pack for a head rest but it's not terribly comfortable but comfort is a notion you'll have to divorce yourself of quickly.  

Once you arrive next Saturday and pick us up from the road we'll have the balance of the day to do a gear check and purchase any last minute provisions.  But these are mostly small coastal communities out here - no walmarts, best buys or REIs.

Hope your training is going well but don't push yourself after Thursday. Stick to stretching exercises.  As cell service is questionable up in the forests, post your questions or last minute concerns here...

One Week Til V Day

A week from today our good friend Valerie from CT is flying to CA to join us on the road for a week.  In her words she wants to experience what our life is like out here and not just walking a mile or a day.  Yep pack, tent, she'll be carrying her on weight.  I've invited her to guest blog here so we can discuss last minute preparations and she can share her side of the adventure.

V - 

I shed my base layers, tops and bottoms in Brookings & I've regretted it since.  Temps in Northern California, or at least this stretch of it ave low 60s in the day and 50s at night.  Sweltering heat from the rogue valley pulls high afternoon winds and fog banks and unless I'm in my tent snuggled up with the boys I'm chilled by the damp air.  

But as I've found along the coastline from Newport OR to here there are different microclimates distinct to each of the areas.

The redwood forests are right around the bend and I can't speak to the climate there yet.  My suggestion is pack lightweight base layers - silk, which I prefer, or wicking synthetic.  Fleece just adds more pack weight & don't think you'll need the heavier fabric.

Shoes - hope you have that worked out by now. Don't know why the vasques cause toe cramping - I love mine - but each foot has different demands.  But that has to be resolved ASAP.  Like fletcher wrote - footwear is the foundation - get that wrong and you won't make it a week.

Don't worry about packing first aid sundries - I keep sufficient supply.  Also I pack a multi tool, extra carabiners, zip ties etc.  

I'm worldly enough to know NOT to tell a woman what grooming/cosmetics to pack but since you'll be carrying your own food and water the pounds add up.  I have nail clippers (since I have to keep toes ultra short) razor & cream (travel size) and axe spray for when I'm in public and haven't had a chance to shower or do laundry.

You'll probably want to bring soap since most campgrounds have showers but I wouldn't expect that luxury more than once during the week.  

Other essentials in your pack - a cpl of ziplock bags to keep your electronics dry, poncho (even though I've only used mine twice in the 3 months on the road), a chamois or microfiber towel, sunblock (I don't carry any), a pkg of wipes or rinse free hand soap, bug spray (though I haven't had much of a problem thus far and I recommend skin so soft rather than a deet based product).  

Pillow - if your body contour requires it but I don't afford the space for one and instead use my clothes sack plus my pack for a head rest but it's not terribly comfortable but comfort is a notion you'll have to divorce yourself of quickly.  

Once you arrive next Saturday and pick us up from the road we'll have the balance of the day to do a gear check and purchase any last minute provisions.  But these are mostly small coastal communities out here - no walmarts, best buys or REIs.

Hope your training is going well but don't push yourself after Thursday. Stick to stretching exercises.  As cell service is questionable up in the forests, post your questions or last minute concerns here....

Orygun

It's never the moving forward that's the hardest thing on a long journey.  It's the leaving behind. 

Tuesday August 5th at 12:30 The fearless fuzzybutts and their kilted mate crossed the stateline into California alongside a dozen or so lovely companions.  The folks of Brookings OR really rallied together and gave us the perfect send off (or they were anxious to kick our fuzzybutts into the next state).

We were greeted by this sign at the Blue Coast Hotel and Zoe, the concierge was most gracious to us during our stay.  The warm welcome and generosity of the folks from Brookings couldn't have exemplified our Oregon experience better.  






From L to R: jan (dog less), Tracey & Greg (with canyon, willy & red) Marlene, & carol with Oso.  Not present in the photo are Donna, the mastermind behind team Brookings, Arliss the chamber of commerce head who helped out a ton, and Suzy Q. Can't thank team Brookings enough for making our last stretch in Oregon so special.  



We found this garden of Eden, smallish white flowered meadow just large enough to accommodate our tent above the cape Sebastian beach.  One of the most magical places we've tented out here and it's significant in that it's the closest we've camped to the water for a few reasons.  High water mark isn't easy to discern and even if I could the tides are semi-diurnal meaning 2 high and low tides per day.  Plus with the mountains most of the coast has been either too far down or outland.

There's a saying that's taken me awhile to learn, 'Don't turn your back on the pacific.'  




Mountain mists and fog banks are a daily occurrence here. High temps from the valley east of the coastal mountains pull cooling air off the Pacific Ocean.  Though they consume the coastline and make visibility limited on the coastal highway, they keep the mornings and late afternoons cool. 






Previous three photos were taken at cape Sebastian beach.  We've seen so much native beauty in Oregon but this place will always hold a special place in our hearts.


Indiana provides quite the comic relief.  His quirky sometimes quixotic character cracks me up.  


Port Orford - the battle rock.  What a stunning vista in one of the smallest coastal towns we've been in.  

So many more photos and videos from the Oregon coast but one common problem had plagued us throughout - cell phone service.  It's so bad I had to get a verizon go phone in case of emergencies.  I hear it's better in northern CA but around the bend is miles and miles or redwood forest and we take it one mile at a time.

But before we move on I want to thank the people who made Oregon so memorable and historic (in no specific order other than on the top of YBD's head):  Cathy the Pyrenees queen, Cathy from Portland who took us to the rose garden; Maria & Chris who helped me rescue the damn dove; Rob & Cindy - never got to use your card rob even tho I hoped to pull it out & say something cool like, 'call this man'; sandy & Anna - thnx for the spacious fenced in lot for us to plop at night and your kind and generous spirits, Vince & Diane - the little green man hopes to see you again on our trek; Candy & the grandkids from the 'Boo'; Kim, Red & Carlie from Florence; heather from the Florence animal shelter, Laura from FOCCAS in coos bay, the animal shelter in gold beach; Maryanne & Greg who looked after Hudson in gold beach;  Jenny who took us to breakfast at a Toyota dealership - that was strange but good; & grandma carol who cried when she had to return Hudson to the road.  

Though the list not complete and for that I apologize our lives are richer and fuller having crossed paths with you in Oregon.  And though we must move on, you'll always be in our thoughts. 

--------

YBDs notes: orygun (sic)

Monday, August 4, 2014

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Coos Bay


View of Coos Bay from the bay bridge


The bay bridge into north bend & oregon's Bay Area.  Me thinks these bridges are getting higher & higher.  HOB HOB


Isthmus slough south of coos bay


The Oregon dunes pushed us back Inland so far that yesterday we had to once again cross the coastal mountain range

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Oregon dunes


Made it thru oregon dunes 40 mile stretch to the bay bridge outside N bend. Dunes as high as 500ft

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Little Green Man

I've been dying to share this story but the last 100 miles have been hard and I've been biding my time. 

It seems my avatar on Tagg's 2dogsagainstcancer.com site has become somewhat iconic.  I didn't realize this until I was enjoying an evening with my good friends Vince & Diane a few weeks back when she shared just how addicted he'd become tracking us on this site.  To the point that he'd check the website in between making rounds and seeing patients.  The folks at Tagg update it typically once a day but there have been a few exceptions and when it's not, it drives Vince nuts.

YBD's Notes - You have to read this in the voice of George castanzas dad's (from seinfield). 

"Why isn't the little green man moving?  What's going on?  Why hasn't he moved?" And then Vince called Diane.  "Get ginger on the phone & find out why the little green man hasn't moved.  Has something happened?  Are they OK?"  And this goes on for like an hour.  

Have to admit I rather like my new status since on the first walk some people called me the dog cancer boy which kinda made me feel like a circus carny.  

I was looking for a JPEG to go with this blog & dontcha know it I came across this musical tribute to the little green man and from Breaking Bad no less.  Here's the link 


Friday, July 18, 2014

Monday, July 14, 2014

Pacific Coast Highway


Tomorrow marks our first week on the PCH and wow what a wicked week it's been.  And I mean wicked in the boston sense - wicked cool, wicked pretty, wicked dangerous, & wicked wicked.  Let me start out with the stretch leading up to it. 

Highway 20

It helps to have native knowledge on the road and I'm grateful for Cindy & Rob & Vince & Diane who on separate occasions took me scouting which convinced me it was way way too risky for the boys and me.  So I did the Salem to Corvallis to Newport stretch alone.  

Without exception it was singularly the deadliest road I've walked. Ever.  I should've known something was amiss by the complete absence of cyclist on Hwy 20 & that was the week of the 4th.

I stopped about midway at a church in eddyville to charge my equipment and the pastor remarked that they should receive hazard pay for living on the highway given the number of deaths.  Great. Thanks for that padre.

The droves of holiday boaters were one thing, the elongated lumber trucks to and from Philomath another but what really posed the greatest risk was the road itself.  The last 15 miles were virtually shoulder less.  That's fine - seen that done that before. But over time the road had eroded to the point that all that's left is inches of composite material that barely provided perch.

Guardrails separated me from 20-30 foot slopes and since I had very little leeway on either side I spent a lot to time straddling them.  In poker you always want to have an out. On the road I call them bailouts.  If you're on a collision course at least you have an option.  At best I had half an out and my odds were no better than a coin toss.

I can assure you, had I walked that stretch of highway 20 with the boys we would not have made it through alive.  Thanks to the folks who helped. 

--------

Newport OR

Was a welcome sight and the start of a new chapter in this journey.  

I reflect back on our first walk when we took the port Jeff from Long Island ferry to Bridgeport CT and our plan was to take 25 up to new town and then over to Hartford.  Everyone I met said you knucklehead, take Route 1 along the New England coastline to boston.  So we turned south and walked back down to west haven and it was one of the best decisions I made.

I feel that way about the PCH and the timing was perfect.  For the most part we've had fair weather but just as I was taking on 20 and cresting the coastal mountains, temperatures in the wilamette valley, a basin that runs from Portland to Eugene, were topping the upper 90s and that's meteorologically significant to the coastal climate.  

As high temps in the valley rise and pull winds and mist off the Pacific Ocean and since we've been on the PCH it's been in the 60s during the day and 50s at nighttime perfect walking conditions for the fuzzybutts.

Except I'm cold.  I've since shed my gloves and neck gator and I'm kinda regretting that now.  There's a weird wettiness even to the warmth with which I am unfamiliar and the chill is sometimes unshakable.  

Whoever said 'the coldest winter I ever spent was the summer I spent in San Francisco'.  I'm not that far south yet but I have an inkling what they were saying.

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For four months we'll be on this road - longer than any other we've travelled and I'm just learning her secrets.  The beauty of the Oregon part of it is if not unparalleled, unsurpassed by any coastline I've walked.  

Still.  I'm quite certain.  She has many secrets left. 











Friday, July 11, 2014

Scenes From the Roadside 2


Dog in bubble window. Never seen the crap outta me. Thought it was alien in a space helmet.


This one messed me up for days... In this context is pud a noun or a verb because I could be a pud & just not know it.  Or if I've been pudding all this time why can't i do it here at this street corner? I hurried along just so's I wouldn't be caught.  But maybe I shouldn't because I just like to pud...


This one is just creepy. We stopped at a dilapidated broke down house for shade & water & discovered this altar?  And to whom? The god of outdated toys? 


Got nothing on this one


Pretty sure there's a serial killer on the loose in woodburn OR


The flora of Oregon Coast

Must admit I'm unfamiliar with native plant life since it's my first time here and haven't yet found a teacher to guide me but the coastline is full of an awesome array of beauties.  Here are just a few I've seen. 




Perhaps you can help us in identifying these.




Friday, July 4, 2014

Leave The Light On

Last nite I slept here
Tuesday nite in a swampy mosquito infestested Burnt Woods trail
And the nite before in a gravel pit just outside Philomath. 

The upside - 7 more nites in places Iike these & I get a free stay!